Day’s Edge Year in Review: 2011

 Posted by at 8:32 pm on December 31, 2011
Dec 312011
 

Is it really almost 2012? Between research, teaching, photography, and films, the last year has really flown by at Day’s Edge Productions. Let’s take a quick look back at some of the things that made 2011 a great year at Day’s Edge:

JANUARY: After winning a travel grant from the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent), Neil attends the Science Online 2011 meeting in North Carolina. He meets lots of new science communicators and starts using Twitter. Around the same time, Neil’s cover feature on burrowing owls is published in Birder’s World magazine.

FEBRUARY: Along with colleagues Molly Mehling, Kari Post, and Melissa Evanson, Nate and Neil launch SustainableFocus.org, a web magazine and online community for scientists, photographers, educators, and anyone interested in using visual media to communicate about science, nature, and sustainability.

MARCH: The Day’s Edge Productions website goes live! Nate receives the 2011 NANPA College Scholarship, and Neil returns to the NANPA college program as a mentor. In McAllen, Texas, they photograph some of the unique wildlife of South Texas. Nate and the other college students produce a short multimedia film in English and Spanish for Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge.

APRIL: Nate and Neil head to “the field” — Formentera for Nate, and Miami for Neil. Nate makes some short videos about his experiments, which you can see here and here. Meanwhile, Neil appears alongside cast members of One Tree Hill in a TV pilot called Wild Life: A New Generation of Wild, produced by award-winning photographer Ian Shive.

MAY: Nate continues his fieldwork in Spain, and is visited by Joris van Alphen. Joris, one of the world’s best young nature photographers, helps with fieldwork and co-produces a short film about lizard cannibalism: “Cold-blooded Cannibals.” Meanwhile, Neil’s article on territorial behavior in birds is published in Living Bird magazine.

JUNE: Nate finishes his field season in Formentera, while Neil returns to Miami to continue the work he started in April. “Cold-blooded Cannibals” wins the NESCent Evolution Film Festival!

JULY: Neil continues his field season, and Nate and Neil produce “Field Vision 6 – Anolemageddon!” a short film about Neil’s experiments in Miami, which is featured on the National Geographic website. Three of our films are screened at the Animal Behavior Film Festival, and “Battle of the Sexes” wins the top prize in the non-commercial division.

AUGUST: Neil and Nate travel to Austin, Texas to teach a Photography for Ecologists workshop at the Annual Ecology Society Association (ESA) meeting. Neil then heads for Puerto Rico to finish up his field season. Nate meets him there to help with research and filming. Together they create “Field Vision 7: Bite Force” – a short film about Neil’s work in Puerto Rico, which is featured on the National Geographic website. Still in Puerto Rico, Nate and Neil visit a remote cave to film “Snakes in a Cave.”

SEPTEMBER: Neil and Liz Losin launch their video “Neuroplasticity”, which was created for the Society of Neuroscience’s film competition.

OCTOBER: Neil and Nate head to the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival and met some amazing filmmakers from around the globe. Later that month, Neil (a National Geographic Young Explorer) gives a public talk about his research at National Geographic Headquarters in a NG Young Explorers Salon. At the end of the month, Nate and Neil launch “Snakes in a Cave”, which is featured on the National Geographic website.

NOVEMBER: Nate and Neil finish “The Runner,” a short film created for the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Film Festival. Later in the month, Neil’s nature photography exhibit opens at the G2 Gallery in Venice, CA.

DECEMBER: “The Runner”wins the jury prize in the WWF film festival. Unfortunately, Nate and Neil can’t travel to India to accept the award in person, but will still be creating a film for WWF in 2012. “Snakes in a Cave” is selected as the 2nd most astounding animal video of 2011 by Scientific American.

It was awesome year and plans are already afoot for an epic 2012! Thanks for all your support in 2011, and Happy New Year to all!